Money Proves To Be Real Motivator In Weight Loss
Articles / Blog
06-10-13 Category: Weight Loss

Money can’t buy you love, happiness, or class, but can it buy you health?

Money proves to be a real motivator in weight loss. It kind of makes sense, right? When we can’t stick to the routine with the discipline required to do something, like get in better shape, it would help if someone would throw a few bucks our way. It would definitely make it easier to put down the extra cookie, or walk an extra mile or two.

The Mayo Clinic, always staying ahead of the curve, asked its employees to participate in a study. Over 12 months, everyone was encouraged to lose weight and results were tallied at the end of each month. One group was offered money and the other was not.

The group who was offered money, called the incentive group, was also required to pay if the weight loss goal of 4 pounds a month was not met. If you lost at least 4 pounds, you got $20. If you did not lose at least 4, you had to pay $20. Interesting right? What’s your guess for the results after 12 months?

The incentive group lost an average of 9.1 pounds over the year-long study, and the non-incentive group only lost 2.6 pounds, on average.

Any Weight Loss Is A Win

Any weight loss in a calendar year for most adult Americans is a success. The group that had money involved (standing to make a profit of $240 if weight was lost each month of the year) did end up with more pounds shed.

Money really is a motivator, in this study’s case, for weight loss.

How can this translate to people who are morbidly obese who need to lose weight to regain physical health?

The Value Of Money

The value of money is put over the value of health. Can we use money to increase health, or are people getting healthy then for the wrong reason?

Should treatment programs incorporate money incentives into weekly and monthly weight loss goals? Can money buy back our neglected health?

Post by: Marissa Maldonado

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