Alcohol Addiction Recovery & Alcoholism Treatment Programs -

Rehabilitation Center For Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, which is commonly abused in the United States. The effects of abusing alcohol depend on various factors, such as age, health, gender, family history as well as how much and how quickly an individual drinks. For instance, if an individual drinks large amount of alcohol, it leads to a higher level of his/her blood alcohol concentration (BAC). This, in turn, is associated with greater impairments in a person’s ability to think clearly, talk, remember information, react and coordinate motor movements.

The 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) highlighted that in 2015, there were 138.3 million Americans aged 12 or older who currently consumed alcohol. Out of this, around 66.7 million indulged in binge alcohol use in the past 30 days and around 17.3 million who engaged in heavy alcohol use.

An individual addicted to alcohol can display a number of symptoms. Some of the common ones include:

  • Slurred speech
  • Mood swings
  • Aggression
  • Memory, balance and coordination problems
  • Poor reactions and judgments
  • Vision/tactile problems
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Hangovers
  • Blackouts
  • Amnesia

Alcohol poisoning

Alcohol poisoning occurs when an individual drinks too much alcohol too quickly in a short period of time. The condition can have potentially life-threatening consequences and can lead to a disturbance in behavioral or mental functioning of an individual, commonly during or after alcohol consumption.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), some of the common signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning include:

  • Low body temperature
  • Bluish, clammy or pale skin color
  • Slurred speech
  • Confusion
  • Loss of coordination
  • Slow, irregular or difficulty breathing
  • Loss of consciousness, coma or inability to awaken
  • Vomiting
  • Slow heart rate
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • Seizures
  • Dehydration

People who do not seek or receive treatment for alcohol poisoning can experience serious complications, such as permanent brain damage, seizures, heart attacks or even death. Immediate medical attention is necessary to avoid fatal consequences.

Warning signs

Warning signs can be helpful to determine if you or a loved one is drinking alcohol in a negative or problematic way. Some of the major warning signs to look for include:

  • Loss of appetite, preferring a drink to a meal
  • Denial or secrecy about alcohol consumption
  • Drinking prior to functions or taking additional alcohol to ensure a sufficient supply
  • Drinking more alcohol to obtain a desired buzz or to feel high (tolerance)
  • Spending time planning the next drink or recovering from the last one
  • Lack of interest in appearance, work, school and relationships
  • Drinking alcohol in the morning (eye opener) to get rid of a hangover or withdrawal symptoms
  • Failed attempts to try to cut back
  • Feeling guilty about drinking
  • Legal problems involving alcohol
  • Withdrawal symptoms, such as tremors, anxiety, headache, nausea, hallucinations and nightmares

Long-term effects

Alcohol is a legal substance, yet it can contribute to serious problems, including alcohol dependence, relationship problems, legal and health consequences and even death. People who drink heavily at one sitting or over long period of time can damage nearly every organ in the body.

The NIAAA reported that drinking too much on a single occasion or over long periods of time can have the following health consequences:

  • Fatty liver
  • Cirrhosis
  • Alcoholic hepatitis
  • Fibrosis
  • Cancer of the mouth, throat, liver, breast and esophagus
  • High blood pressure
  • Irregular heart beat
  • Stretching and drooping of the heart muscle
  • Heart disease
  • Weakened immune system
  • Alcohol dependence

Types of drinking

There are three main types of drinking that include:

  • Binge drinking is defined as consuming five or more drinks by men and four or more drinks by women in one sitting.
  • Alcohol abuse is about drinking continuously in spite of the harmful consequences experienced in life – social, personal, professional or legal.
  • Alcoholism, also called alcohol use disorder, is a compulsive need to drink and a high tolerance for alcohol, which means an individual must drink more to feel buzzed. These individuals are not willing to or cannot stop or cut back on their drinking without assistance. They experience withdrawal symptoms, such as tremors in case they try to stop or cut back on their alcohol intake on their own.

Alcoholism treatment is paramount once the individual has accepted that they have a problem. Whatever form of abusive drinking a person takes part in, their best course of action is to seek alcohol addiction recovery at an alcohol rehab center.

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Why choose Sovereign Health of California?

Sovereign Health’s alcohol treatment programs target the physical effects of alcohol and underlying conditions that fuel the patients’ addiction. Counted among some of the best alcohol detox centers in the U.S, our alcohol rehab provides detoxification treatment along with an effective treatment for alcohol addiction.

Our alcohol detox centers offer complete rehabilitation for alcohol abuse and dependence. Sovereign Health’s alcohol rehab medical staff ensures that every patient who undergoes detox program does so only as per the expert’s  guidelines. As part of our comprehensive alcoholism treatment programs, we offer conventional clinical therapies as well as alternative treatments, such as art therapy, yoga, equine therapy, neurofeedback training and cognitive retraining.

We accept most private insurance plans and provide treatment loans to those who do not have insurance and need assistance covering the costs of treatment. If you would like further information about our alcohol detox treatment, please call our 24/7 helpline to speak with a member of our admissions team. They will be happy to answer your questions.

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