Report shows sharp decline in number of opioid prescriptions filled in US - Sovereign Health Group
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Report shows sharp decline in number of opioid prescriptions filled in US

The overall number of opioid prescriptions filled by mail and retail-order pharmacies has seen an average decline of 8.9 percent across the U.S., according to reports related by a health data firm.

The new report by the IQVIA’s Institute for Human Data Science showed the biggest drop of 12 percent in total doses of prescription opioids in 2017 compared to 2016. According to the report released on April 19, 2018, all 50 states and the District of Columbia showed a reduction of over 5 percent. However, 18 states, including New England and those bearing the brunt of the opioid crisis, such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia, showed over 10 percent decline.

“We’re at a really critical moment in the country when everybody’s paying attention to this issue. People really don’t want them if they can avoid them,” said Michael Kleinrock, the research director of the institute. The report also suggested that besides the reduction in the morphine milligram equivalents (MMEs), the number of actual dispensed prescriptions for opioids came down by 10.2 percent in 2017. Additionally, even prescriptions for high doses of opioids involving over 90 MMEs per day with higher risk of addiction fell by 16.1 percent during the same year.

Experts attribute these achievements to more prescriptions being prescribed for a shorter duration, and a 7.8 percent fall in new patients on opioids. Americans consume nearly 30 percent of all opioid drugs used globally, which, in fact, has pushed the nation toward one of the worst drug crises in its history. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of overdose deaths involving opioids in 2016 was five times higher than in 1999.

In a bid to curb the spiraling overdose death rates involving prescription opioids, the federal government and many states have introduced several measures that include restricting the duration or dose of opioid painkillers. Similarly, pharmacies and insurance companies have also started placing such checks to deal with opioid misuse. To ensure effective implementation of the measures, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has mandated prosecution in the case of heavy prescriptions. Additionally, multiple heath care agencies, bodies, and medical groups have issued compulsory prescribing guidelines, including the discretion to recommend other non-opioid pain management options, if possible.

Kicking menace of addiction

Many Americans abuse prescription drugs, which are prescribed for others, because they are least aware of the potential threats posed by them. Whereas, those who genuinely hold a doctor’s prescription for a specific drug are no less guilty. Such people generally take more than the prescribed quantity to get the high. Once the drug enters the bloodstream, it generally creates a dopamine rush in the brain, and the abuser gets addicted to the pleasurable sensation. In such a situation, help from a reputed drug abuse rehabilitation center can go a long way in breaking free from the clutches of addiction.

If an individual wants to do away with opioid addiction, he/she should undergo NAD therapy. NAD+ stands for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. In fact, drug abuse or a mental ailment depletes our NAD+ levels. The therapy can help restore the diminished levels of NAD+ in the body and improve brain functionality. Sovereign Health of California understands the plight of someone who is unable to discontinue the use of opioids despite the negative impact on his or her life. Our customized NAD treatment for addiction is designed to treat the person holistically. If you or your loved one is battling addiction to any prescription drug, call our 24/7 helpline or chat online with our counselor to know about the most effective therapies at our state-of-the-art rapid detox centers.

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